Wednesday, 12 September 2012

What a summer of sport it has been

What a summer of sport it has been. The Olympics were the pinnacle of human achievement as elite sport reached its zenith! Then came the Paralympics with some unbelievable performances that captivated the globe and brought a whole new audience to these amazing events! The triathlon in the Olympics has created a whole new army of fans.

Well now there’s a chance for everyone to get on to the triathlon bandwagon! There are 10 days to go until the Virgin Active London Triathlon gets under way at London’s Excel centre.

As usual –and because of its increasing popularity The London Triathlon Expo will run alongside the Virgin Active London Triathlon. The Expo is situated at around the finish line of the Triathlon Race and combines a great spectacle alongside some of the best products cycling, swimming and running has to provide. Many exhibiters are there showing their products and everything from nutrition to drinks to help everyone from the beginner to the more sophisticated participants.

Virgin Active Trialthlon 2011
Virgin Active Trialthlon 2011
The Expo is still free to enter, so even for those not competing who simply wish to watch the race or learn more about getting fit, the Expo is the ideal place to be. Relax with a coffee in the Café, listen to Triathlon experts, purchase the newest products on the market, update kit, have your swim technique analysed by expert swim coaches, get expert nutritional advice, watch the elite winners award presentation and see the emotion of thousands of athletes as they come down the final straight and cross the finish line.

Come and see Choose Cherries Visit Stand G60 at London Excel 22-23rd September to try Tart Cherry Juice for yourself! See how Tart Cherry Juice can make a difference to your post recovery regime! www.choosecherries.co.uk  or www.choosecherries.com

Friday, 31 August 2012

Efficacy of Tart Cherry Juice to Reduce Inflammation

Efficacy of Tart Cherry Juice to Reduce Inflammation Biomarkers among Women with Inflammatory Osteoarthritis (OA) - Research via Macrothink Institute
Copyright © Macrothink Institute   ISSN 2166-1073
Kerry S. Kuehl, Diane L. Elliot, Adriana E. Sleigh, Jennifer L. Smith

Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of pain and disability. OA patients may find relief from the inflammatory component of OA with NSAID use. Tart cherries, high in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, may reduce pain and inflammation without the adverse side effects of NSAIDs. This study aimed to assess the effects of tart cherry juice as compared to a placebo cherry drink on serum biomarkers among inflammatory OA subjects.

Methods The design was a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial. Twenty inflammatory OA subjects (all female; 40-70 yrs) consumed 10.5 oz bottles of tart cherry juice or placebo cherry drink twice daily for 21 consecutive days. Participants assessed level of pain at baseline and after the intervention. Blood samples were collected at baseline and final visit to assess the biomarkers of inflammation: C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Interleukin-10 (IL-10), and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TMF-α). Data are reported as mean +/- SD for pre and post serum biomarkers.

Results Subjects on the tart cherry juice showed a statistically significant reduction in the serum biomarker CRP (p<0 .05=".05" b="b">

Conclusions Tart cherry juice may reduce inflammation as measured by certain serum inflammatory biomarkers among women with OA.

References: Kuehl K, Elliot D, Sleigh A, Smith J. Efficacy of Tart Cherry Juice to Reduce Inflammation Biomarkers among Women with Inflammatory Osteoarthritis (OA). (2012) Journal of Food Studies, 1(1), 14-25.

Wednesday, 8 August 2012

Cherries. A Nutrition Powerhouse

Cherries powerful package of antioxidants and phytonutrients delivers:

Anthocyanins – Unique antioxidants that are responsible for cherries’ deep red color…and for the fruit’s anti-inflammatory benefits. Researchers suggests cherries may work like common pain medications used by athletes to reduce post-exercise muscle soreness.

Melatonin – a potent antioxidant that may help improve the body’s natural sleep patterns. Health and wellness experts agree that how long and how well you sleep may impact overall quality of your training.

Other antioxidants – cherries contain at least 17 antioxidants, including powerful antioxidants egallic acid, p-coumaric acid, kaempferol and quercetin, an antioxidant that may help boost immunity…keeping your training schedule on track.

Essential nutrients – cherries are a good source of vitamin A (beta carotene) and also contain fibre. Sports dietician Leslie Bonci, M.P.H., R.D. LDN, CSSD created the Red Recovery Routine to help athletes manage and minimize their pain – no matter what your fitness level.

Monday, 6 August 2012

How Tart Cherries can help battle insomnia

Tart cherries are also a good source of Melatonin. A person’s body produces its own Melatonin in the pineal gland at the base of the brain; however, Mother Nature also produces Melatonin. One great source of this is the tart cherry.


This means that drinking tart cherry juice everyday increases the Melatonin in your body. Why is this good? Melatonin supplements are used to help individuals who suffer from insomnia, helping them to fall asleep, stay asleep, and be well rested in the morning. This Melatonin can be found in dried cherries, frozen cherries, as well as cherry juice. When cherries are taken on a regular basis, it will help regulate a person’s natural sleep cycle as well as improve their quality of sleep.

Friday, 3 August 2012

Go Red Instead to Manage Pain

Along with providing the fruit's bright red colour, the antioxidant compounds in tart cherries – called anthocyanins – have been specifically linked to high antioxidant capacity and reduced inflammation, at levels comparable to some well-known pain medications.3

















Previous research on tart cherries and osteoarthritis conducted by researchers at Baylor Research Institute found that a daily dose of tart cherries (as cherry extract) helped reduce osteoarthritis pain by more than 20 percent for the majority of men and women.. And the same compounds linked to cherries' arthritis benefits have now shown promise for athletes and sports recovery to help relieve muscle and joint soreness.

According to Director of Sports Nutrition at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center for Sports Medicine, Leslie Bonci, MPH, RD, CSSD, LDN, who has incorporated tart cherries into the training menu of both her professional athletes and active clients as a natural and easy way to manage pain that also tastes great, "Why not eat red when there's so much science to support the anti-inflammatory benefits of this Super Fruit? And for athletes whose palates prefer the tart-sweet flavour profile of tart cherries, it's the optimal ingredient."

Sources: 1. Sleigh, AE, Kuehl KS, Elliot DL . Efficacy of tart cherry juice to reduce inflammation among patients with osteoarthritis. American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. May 30, 2012.
2. Kuehl KS, Perrier ET, Elliot DL, Chestnutt J. Efficacy of tart cherry juice in reducing muscle pain during running: a randomized controlled trial. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 2010;7:17-22.
3. Seeram NP, Momin RA, Nair MG, Bourquin LD. Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant cyanidin glycosides in cherries and berries. Phytomedicine 2001;8:362-369.
4. Cush JJ. Baylor Research Institute, pilot study on tart cherry and osteoarthritis of the knees, 2007.

Thursday, 2 August 2012

Tart cherries may help reduce inflammation

Tart cherries may help millions reduce inflammation to manage pain, according to new research- LANSING, Mich., May 30, 2012 – Tart cherries may help reduce chronic inflammation, especially for the millions of Americans suffering from debilitating joint pain and arthritis, according to new research from Oregon Health & Science University presented today at the American College of Sports Medicine Conference (ACSM) in San Francisco, Calif.1 In fact, the researchers suggest tart cherries have the "highest anti-inflammatory content of any food" and can help people with osteoarthritis manage their disease.

In a study of twenty women ages 40 to 70 with inflammatory osteoarthritis, the researchers found that drinking tart cherry juice twice daily for three weeks led to significant reductions in important inflammation markers – especially for women who had the highest inflammation levels at the start of the study. "With millions of Americans looking for ways to naturally manage pain, it's promising that tart cherries can help, without the possible side effects often associated with arthritis medications," said Kerry Kuehl, M.D, Dr.PH., M.S., Oregon Health & Science University, principal study investigator. "I'm intrigued by the potential for a real food to offer such a powerful anti-inflammatory benefit – especially for active adults."

Wednesday, 1 August 2012

What research has been done on tart cherries?

Although anthocyanins, which are also found in blueberries and other purplish-red fruits and vegetables, are known to be powerful antioxidants, no studies have looked at whether cherries--tart or sweet-can relieve symptoms of arthritis, gout, or diabetes outside the lab.


  • A small randomised controlled trial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine examined the effectiveness of a tart cherry juice blend in preventing symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage. Fourteen male college students drank 12 fl oz of a cherry juice blend or a placebo, twice per day for eight consecutive days. Strength loss was significantly lower in people taking the cherry juice (4%) compared with the placebo (22%). Pain was also significantly lower in people taking the cherry juice.

  • Jill M. Tall, Ph.D., research fellow at Johns Hopkins, was the lead researcher of a study that tested the effectiveness of orally administrated anthocyanins from tart cherries on inflammation-induced pain in rats. The results of the study suggested that tart cherry anthocyanins may have a beneficial role in reducing inflammatory pain.

Tuesday, 31 July 2012

Tart Cherries can help reduce inflammation


American College of Sports Medicine conference (abstract 1389), drinking tart cherry juice twice a day for three weeks resulted in significant reduction of inflammatory markers. The study, conducted by researchers from Oregon Health and Science University, involved 20 women between the age of 40 and 70 who had inflammatory osteoarthritis.
Anthocyanins are the compounds in tart cherries that give the fruit their vibrant colour, high antioxidant level, and ability to reduce inflammation. There have been previous studies that linked tart cherries to decreased joint pain and muscle pain. In this study, researchers said that up to 40% of osteoarthritis patients have inflammation and "tart cherries may provide beneficial anti-inflammatory activity helping OA patients manage their disease."

Wednesday, 25 July 2012

Triathlon Recovery

With the Olympics now featuring the Triathlon as one of its events the time is right to focus on getting in shape for the up and coming Virgin Triathlon event at London Excel in September.

Whether you are just starting out or are an experienced “campaigner” everyone will agree that the way forward is to not only exercise correctly but what you put in your body helps it deal with the rigours and after effects of intense training and even competition. Tart Cherries, in whatever format you can get them in, are not only powerful antioxidants but more and more research is beginning to show that Cherries have amazing properties which are only now beginning to be understood. The triathlon is the kind of event where tart cherry juice can be beneficial and can help recovery from these strenuous events.

Friday, 20 July 2012

Beautiful Cherry-Almond Muffins

Cherries are rich in antioxidants that may help fight inflammation, and the fibre in these muffins can help you feel full for hours. Makes 12




















 
  • 340g whole wheat pastry flour
  • 113g almondflour*'
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp: baking soda
  • ¼ tsp:salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • 177ml reduced-fat sour cream
  • 113g natural cane or regular sugar
  • 78ml Cup canola or light olive oil
  • 1 tsp almond extract
  • 340g cups pitted and quartered fresh cherries


Preheat oven to 200°c. In a large bowl, mix together flours, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda and salt. In a separate bowl, 1ightly beat eggs, and then stir in sour cream, sugar, oil, and almond extract. Gently mix wet ingredients with dry ingredients. Fold in cherries. Divide batter among 12 greased or paper-lined muffin cups. Bake for 22 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the centre of a muffin comes out clean. Let cool several minutes before unmolding.

* Almond flour, also called almond meal, is available at health-food stores and in the gluten-free section of larger grocery stores. Keep it in the refrigerator or freezer to maintain freshness.

Per Muffin: 183 calories, 5g protein, 12g fat (2g saturated), 16g carbohydrates, 71 mg sodium, 3g fibre

Wednesday, 18 July 2012

Three Cheers for Cherries..

... as studies show this superfruit may be good medicine.

According to THE ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION generations of people have reported that cherries help keep painful osteo-arthritis (OA) and gout flares in check. Until recently this was considered old wives tales but recently scientists have started to put these stories to the test….and guess what they have started to show really promising results.

Researchers tested different amounts of several varieties of cherries in almost every form, from juice to pills. And though most studies are small and the findings preliminary, evidence of the benefits of cherries is growing and how they can help in managing Gout and Osteo-arthritis relief!

Gout Management
Boston University .Medical Centre researchers carried out a study on 633 participants. They found that eating at least 10 cherries a day protected people who were suffering with gout from recurrent attacks. The findings were published in a supplement to the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism. The study co-author- Hyon, K. Choi "Cherry intake was associated with a 50 percent lower risk of gout flares over a 48-hour period. We extrapolate that cherries will continue to work long-term."

He attributes the positive results to anthocyanins - plant pigments that are believed to have powerful anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Anthocyanins are found in. red and purple fruits, including raspberries and blueberries, but cherries, especially tart cherries, may contain higher levels.

Liquid cherry extract - found in health-food specialty stores- appears to provide the same benefits. In a .retrospective study of 24 patients presented at the 010annual meeting of the European League Against Rheumatism, researchers at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, N.J., saw a 50 percent reduction in flares when gout patients took one tablespoon of tart cherry extract -the equivalent of 45 to 60 cherries – twice a day for four months.

This is definitely a topic worth further investigation, "Dr.Choi says "If cherries prove effective in large trials, they could provide a safe, non-pharmacological option for preventing recurrent gout attacks."

Monday, 16 July 2012

Searching for the next super fruit star

Will Cherrys be the next fruit to rise to the top?

In recent years, consumers have embraced superfruits, such as pomegranate, acai, blueberry and cranberry, for their antioxidant content. However, certain cherry varietals also rank alongside the more renowned super fruits in terms of antioxidant content. Although the fruit has long been favored as a pie filling and ice cream sundae topper, cherry is still establishing itself as a beverage ingredient, but suppliers say that’s ripe for a change.

Wednesday, 11 July 2012

Cherries - Buy 'em: DRIED!

Sweet Bing cherries are highly susceptible to bruising during international winter shipping, and your wallet may be bruised by their high winter price. They also lag behind tart cherries -- the version most often found dried -- in levels of vitamin C and beta-carotene.


"Beta-carotene is a building block for vitamin A, so it helps maintain healthy skin, bones, and immunity," Somer says.

Removing the moisture also makes dried tart cherries particularly concentrated in anthocyanins, which are potent antioxidants, she adds. Just be sure to seek out unsweetened versions so you don't get too much sugar.






  • Like a number of “superfruits”, cherries boast a formidable antioxidant content. However, it appears that they may have more specific health benefits to offer in a number of very promising growth areas, such as sports nutrition, pain management and combating sleeplessness.
  • Cherries more dynamic than blueberries and cranberries.
  • Luckily, in order to enjoy the taste and health benefits of cherries, consumers are not limited to eating them in their fresh state, but can resort to frozen, dried and powdered formats as well as drinking cherry juice. Needless to say, this inherent versatility is good news for a range of players engaged in the health and wellness industry.
  • Their high antioxidant content makes cherries and cherry products instant candidates for several health and wellness positioning platforms, including cardiovascular health, brain health and memory, beauty from within and anti-ageing. Being a rich source of carotenoids (which are grouped in with antioxidants) means that cherries potentially also lend themselves well to a vision health positioning.

Monday, 9 July 2012

Battling the effects of Gout and Arthritis

Drinking tart cherry juice can help prevent gout attacks, relieve muscle soreness after exercise, and possibly help with arthritis pain because of its natural anti-inflammatory properties.

Gout expert Naomi Schlesinger, M.D., says the juice seems to reduce the joint inflammation that gout causes. Schlesinger led a study that found patients who took a tablespoon of tart cherry juice concentrate twice a day for four months cut the frequency of their gout attacks in half.

More than a third remained gout attack-free. Other studies have shown that drinking tart cherry juice daily helps runners reduce muscle soreness and reduces inflammation in overweight patients.

Unlike its sweeter cousins, the Bing and black cherry, the tart cherry is bright red and higher in antioxidants.

Friday, 29 June 2012

Cherries more dynamic than blueberries and cranberries

Analyst Insight by Ewa Hudson, Head of Health and Wellness Research

Like a number of “superfruits”, cherries boast a formidable antioxidant content. However, it appears that they may have more specific health benefits to offer in a number of very promising growth areas, such as sports nutrition, pain management and combating sleeplessness.

Cherries are enjoying a surge in popularity. Euromonitor International's fresh food statistics show that global volume sales of fresh cherries rose by 17% over the 2006-2011 review period, outperforming other high-end fresh fruit “treats” like strawberries and grapes.   In 2011, cherries emerged as the second most dynamic fresh fruit category, achieving a 4% volume gain, ahead of cranberries/blueberries.


Global volume sales of cherries amounted to 1.3 million tonnes in 2011, which was only marginally below that of cranberries/blueberries and less than half of the volumes achieved by strawberries.  Although an ongoing hit with consumers, the market for fresh cherries remains constrained by both seasonality and a short shelf life. Unlike some types of berries, such as strawberries, blueberries and raspberries, which are also highly perishable but whose seasonality can be artificially prolonged, for example through the use of polytunnels, cherries only manage to make a comparatively short-lived annual appearance.

Luckily, in order to enjoy the taste and health benefits of cherries, consumers are not limited to eating them in their fresh state, but can resort to frozen, dried and powdered formats as well as drinking cherry juice. Needless to say, this inherent versatility is good news for a range of players engaged in the health and wellness industry.

Friday, 22 June 2012

The Red Recovery Routine


Sports dietitian Leslie Bonci, M.P.H., R.D. LDN, CSSD created the Red Recovery Routine to help athletes manage and minimize their pain – no matter what your fitness level.

 
























Leanne Shear, co-founder, Rogue Female Fitness, runner and blogger: “In addition to being a coach and trainer, I am a serious marathon runner – and I can’t live without cherries! I am addicted to the muscle recovery, as well as the healthy boost of delicious carbs they provide post-run. Now my clients love them too. It’s a win/win!”

Thomas Tan, Ph.D., runner and blogger: “As a scientist immersed in inflammation research, and a regular participant in ultramarathons, I can attest the Red Recovery Routine has had a major impact in my recovery and performance.”

Thursday, 21 June 2012

Cherry Juice Hard to find

Although a number of packaged food and beverage categories will be able to benefit from the rise of the cherry as a superfruit, it is the fruit/vegetable juice category which holds the most promise. Fruit juice is widely perceived as being almost as “natural” as the fresh fruit, while having the added advantage of year-round availability. The cherry juice category is only just emerging, with many gaps waiting to be filled.


For instance, it is currently a challenge to find 100% cherry juice on retailer shelves. Cherry juice products, even those consisting of 100% fruit juice, tend to be blended products, ie consisting of a mixture of fruit juices. Ocean Spray Cranberries Inc launched its new Ocean Spray Cherry range in February 2012, with the tagline “Real Cherries. Real Good”. The four new offerings are juice drinks, combining cherry juice with other juices, such as cranberry and orange.

UK-based Cherrygood Ltd, whose range of cherry juices is available from most of the country's major supermarkets, and which makes much of the health and wellness benefits of cherry juice in its marketing, launched Cherrygood Premium Cherry in January 2012. The product is promoted as possessing “a higher antioxidant content than any other leading chilled juice”, devoid of additives, preservatives, sugar and 100% natural. However, its cherry juice content is just 40%, with the rest consisting of apple juice.

Even Voelkel, a German beverage company specialising in high-quality natural and organic juices, only offers cherry juice as a combination product of apple and cherry juice.


The issue hinges on both taste and price. Pure 100% cherry juice has quite a strong taste, which is not unpleasant, but it may not be appreciated by all consumers. It is also expensive to produce. The 100% cranberry juice category remains a niche for those same reasons. Pure cranberry juice is mainly purchased on medicinal grounds by women suffering from recurring urinary tract infections.

However, 100% or near-100% cherry juice has much greater potential than the cranberry equivalent. Compared to cranberry juice, which centres its high antioxidant value on urinary tract health, cherry juice's health and wellness remit is far broader, encompassing more mainstream health concerns like insomnia and pain management.

In the past, when cherry juice was mainly purchased because of its flavour, a satisfactory flavour profile could be achieved with a fairly low proportion of cherry juice (or none at all!), and consumers had no or few qualms about this. Now, however, with cherry's unstoppable emergence as a superfruit sporting a number of specific health benefits, a growing number of consumers will start to seek out products with high cherry juice content, and will be happy to contend with the more robust flavour.


Monday, 18 June 2012

Cherries still missing from the sports nutrition market

On the sports nutrition front, cherries and cherry products may have an application in speeding up post-exercise recovery and improving performance. The American College of Sports Medicine published an article in August 2011 in its journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise which suggested that cherry juice was able to reduce muscle damage caused by intensive strength exercise. The researchers stipulated that this effect was due to cherry juice's high antioxidant content attenuating the oxidative damage caused by this type of exercise.

At present, cherry ingredients are not commonly employed as functional ingredients by mainstream sports product manufacturers. For example, GlaxoSmithKline's Lucozade branded sports drinks, despite offering cherry flavour varieties, makes nothing of cherries' potential in the realm of post-exercise muscle recovery. Lucozade Sport Lite Cherry, launched in the UK in August 2011, only contains cherry flavouring, as does Lucozade Body Fuel Drink Cherry.

Cherry juice positioned as a functional product is being left to specialist producers. UK-based CherryActive, founded in 2005, for instance, offers CherryActive Concentrate made from Montmorency cherry juice, available bottled or in pouches. The product is primarily positioned at the sports nutrition market, although the company makes reference to joint health, sleep and other antioxidant-related health benefits. In addition to juice, CherryActive also offers freeze-dried powdered cherries in capsules and dried Montmorency cherries for snacking.

In the future, we should start to see more mainstream products in the sports drinks arena, such as, for example, sports drinks employing a significant proportion of cherry juice in order to appeal to people seeking sports drinks with a more natural positioning. Protein shakes with added cherry powder (from freeze-dried cherries) and snack bars with dried cherries and/or cherry powder are also likely to appeal to consumers interested in sports nutrition products.

Friday, 15 June 2012

Relief for Painful Joints

Fresh cherries are a traditional remedy for alleviating the pain associated with gout and arthritis. Some research has shown that they help the body excrete excess uric acid, which causes gout, and also that certain phytochemicals present in cherries may combat the inflammation responsible for arthritic pain. 

Anti-inflammatory drugs currently constitute the mainstay medical treatment for arthritis management, and consumers are always looking for natural alternatives, enabling them to reduce the amount of medication they are taking, and cherry products may prove to be an ideal and highly palatable adjunct.

Driven by global population ageing, bone and joint health is destined to become an important positioning platform. For the 32 markets covered by Euromonitor International's in-depth health and wellness research, sales of foods and beverages with a prime positioning focus on bone and joint health amounted to US$13.8 billion in 2010.

Tuesday, 12 June 2012

Oregon Health & Science University presented today 30th MAY 2012 at the American College of Sports Medicine Conference (ACSM)

Tart Cherries May Help Millions Reduce Inflammation to Manage Pain, According to New Research

Tart cherries may help reduce chronic inflammation, especially for the millions of people suffering from debilitating joint pain and arthritis, according to new research from) in San Francisco, California.1 In fact, the researchers suggest tart cherries have the “highest anti-inflammatory content of any food” and can help people with osteoarthritis manage their disease.

In a study of twenty women ages 40 to 70 with inflammatory osteoarthritis, the researchers found that drinking tart cherry juice twice daily for three weeks led to significant reductions in important inflammation markers – especially for women who had the highest inflammation levels at the start of the study.

“With millions of Americans looking for ways to naturally manage pain, it’s promising that tart cherries can help, without the possible side effects often associated with arthritis medications,” said Kerry Kuehl, M.D, Dr.PH., M.S., Oregon Health & Science University, principal study investigator. “I’m intrigued by the potential for a real food to offer such a powerful anti-inflammatory benefit – especially for active adults.”



Often characterised as “wear and tear” arthritis, osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. Athletes are often at a greater risk for developing the condition, given their excessive joint use that can cause a breakdown in cartilage and lead to pain and injury, according to the Arthritis Foundation. The inflammation benefits could be particularly important for athletes, according to Kuehl’s previous research. In a past study he found that people who drank tart cherry juice while training for a long distance run reported significantly less pain after exercise than those who didn’t.2


Along with providing the fruit’s bright red colour, the antioxidant compounds in tart cherries – called anthocyanins – have been specifically linked to high antioxidant capacity and reduced inflammation, at levels comparable to some well-known pain medications.3

Sources:
Sleigh, AE, Kuehl KS, Elliot DL . Efficacy of tart cherry juice to reduce inflammation among patients with osteoarthritis. American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. May 30, 2012.
2. Kuehl KS, Perrier ET, Elliot DL, Chestnutt J. Efficacy of tart cherry juice in reducing muscle pain during running: a randomized controlled trial. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 2010;7:17-22. Phytomedicine 2001;8:362-369.
3. Seeram NP, Momin RA, Nair MG, Bourquin LD. Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant cyanidin glycosides in cherries and berries.

Monday, 28 May 2012

Gout and Arthritus

For decades arthritis and gout sufferers have regularly consumed tart cherry juice for relief of symptoms. As early as the 1950’s, the science began to support this long-held tradition, linking cherry consumption to less pain associated with gout attacks. 46

More recent studies have supported this finding. One study found that when healthy women ate two servings (280 grams) of cherries after an overnight fast, they showed a 15 percent reduction in uric acid levels, as well as lowered nitric oxide and C-reactive protein levels – all of which is associated with inflammatory diseases like gout.47

Another study supported a lower uric acid level after cherry consumption, finding that after drinking eight ounces of tart cherry juice daily for four weeks, many adults had lower levels of uric acid. 44

The inflammatory benefits have potential to extend to arthritis sufferers too. In a 12-week pilot study conducted by researchers at Baylor Research Institute, a daily dose of tart cherries (as cherry extract) helped reduce osteoarthritis pain by more than 20 percent for the majority of men and women. 48


44. Martin KR, Bopp J, Burrell L, Hook G. The effect of 100% tart cherry juice on serum uric acid levels, biomarkers of inflammation and cardiovascular disease risk factors. FASEB J 2011;25:339.2.
46. Blau LW. Cherry diet control for gout and arthritis. Tex Rep Biol Med. 1950;8:309-311.
47. Jacob RA, Spinozzi GM, Simon VA, Kelly DS, Prior RL, Hess-Pierce B, Kader AA. Consumption of cherries lowers plasma urate in healthy women. J Nutr 2003;133:1826-182948. Cush JJ. Baylor Research Institute, pilot study on tart cherry and osteoarthritis of the knees, 2007.
48. Cush JJ. Baylor Research Institute, pilot study on tart cherry and osteoarthritis of the knees, 2007.


Friday, 25 May 2012

Anthocyanins

Tart cherries contain the highest concentrations of anthocyanins 1 and 2 which help block enzymes associated with inflammation. Tart cherries contain significantly more anthocyanins than other fruits, including sweet cherries.16,18





















16. Seeram NP, Momin RA, Nair MG, Bourquin LD. Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant cyanidin glycosides in cherries and berries. Phytomedicine 2001;8:362-369.
18. Kim DO, Heo HJ, Kim YJ, Yang HS, Lee CY. Sweet and sour cherry phenolics and their protective effects on neuronal cells. J Agric Food Chem 2005;53:9921-9927.

Thursday, 24 May 2012

Understanding ORAC

Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) is a measure of antioxidant strength. ORAC measures how many oxygen radicals a specific food can absorb and deactivate. The more oxygen radicals a food can absorb, the higher its ORAC score.

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

Phytonutrient Match-Up

See how other fruits match up to cherries’ powerful phytonutrient profile. 3,5,16,19-37*

*3 - Kirakosyan A, Seymour EM, Llanes DEU, Kaufman PB, Bolling SF. Chemical profile and antioxidant capacities of tart cherry products. Food Chem 2009;115:20-25.
5 - Wang H, Nair MG, Strasburg GM, Booren AM, Gray JI. Antioxidant polyphenols from tart cherries (Prunus cerasus). J Agric Food Chem 1999;47:840-844.
16 - Seeram NP, Momin RA, Nair MG, Bourquin LD. Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant cyanidin glycosides in cherries and berries. Phytomedicine 2001;8:362-369.
19-37
19. Aaby K, Ekeberg D, Skrede G. Characterization of phenolic compounds in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) fruits by different HPLC detectors and contribution of individual compounds to total antioxidant capacity. J Agric Food Chem 2007;55:4395-4406.
20. Badria FA. Melatonin, serotonin, and tryptamine in some Egyptian food and medicinal food and medicinal plants. J Med Food 2002;5:153-157.
21. Bonerz D, Würth, K, Dietrich H, Will F. Analytical characterization
and the impact of ageing on anthocyanin composition and degradation in juices from five sour cherry cultivars. Eur Food Res Technol 2007;224:355-364.
22. Boyer J, Liu RH. Apple phytochemicals and their health benefits. Nutr J 2004, 3:5.
23. Brownmiller C, Howard L, Prior R. Processing and storage effects on procyanidin composition and concentration of processed blueberry products. J Agric Food Chem 2009;57:1896–1902.
24. Burkhardt S, Tan DX, Manchester LC, Hardeland R, Reiter RJ. Detection and quantification of the antioxidant melatonin in Montmorency and Balaton tart cherries (Prunus cerasus). J Agric Food Chem 2001;49:4898–4902.
25. Cho MJ, Howard LR, Prior RL, Clark JR. Flavonoid glycosides and antioxidant capacity of various blackberry, blueberry and red grape genotypes determined by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. J Sci Food Agric 2004;84:1771-1782.
26. Gil MI, Tomás-Barberán FA, Hess-Pierce B, Holcroft DM, Kader AA. Antioxidant activity of pomegranate juice and its relationship with phenolic composition and processing. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48:4581-4589.
27. Lansky EP, Newman RA. Punica granatum (pomegranate) and its potential for prevention
and treatment of inflammation and cancer.
J Ethnopharmacol 2007;109:177-206.
28. Lopes da Silva F, Escribano-Bailóna MT, Alonsoa JJP, Rivas-Gonzaloa JC, Santos-Buelga C. Anthocyanin pigments in strawberry. Food Sci Technol 2007;40:374-382.
29. Manach C, Scalbert A, Morand C, Rémésy C, Jiménez L. Polyphenols: food sources and
bioavailability. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;79:727-747.
30. Noda Y, Kaneyuki T, Mori A, Packer L. Antioxidant activities of pomegranate fruit extract and its
anthocyanidins: delphinidin, cyanidin, and pelargonidin. J Agric Food Chem 2002;50:166-171.
31. Olsson ME, Ekvall J, Gustavsson KE, Nilsson J, Pillai D, Sjöholm I, Svensson U, Akesson B, Nyman MG. Antioxidants, low molecular weight carbohydrates, and total antioxidant capacity in strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa): Effects of cultivar, ripening, and storage. J Agric Food Chem 2004;52:2490-2498.

32. Pascual Teresa S, Santos Buelga C, Rivas Gonzalo JC. Quantitative analysis of flavan-3-ols in Spanish foodstuffs and beverages. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48:5331-5337.
33. Piccolella S, Fiorentino A, Pacifico S, D’Abrosca B, Uzzo P, Monaco P. Antioxidant properties of sour cherries (Prunus cerasus L.): Role of colorless phytochemicals
from the methanolic extract of ripe fruits. J Agric Food Chem 2008;56:1928-1935.
34. Sellappan S, Akoh CC, Krewer G. Phenolic compoundsand antioxidant capacity of Georgia-grown blueberries and blackberries. J Agric Food Chem 2002;50:2432–2438.
35. Vrhovsek U, Rigo A, Tonon D, Mattivi F. Quantitation of polyphenols in different apple varieties. J Agric Food Chem 2004;52:6532-6538.
36. Walaszek Z, Szemraj J, Hanausek M, Adams AK, Sherman U. D-glucaric acid content of various fruits and vegetables and cholesterol-lowering effects of dietary D-glucarate in the rat. Nutr Res 1996;16:673-681.
37. Wang H, Nair MG, Strasburg GM, Booren AM, Gray JI. Novel antioxidant compounds from tart cherries (Prunus cerasus). J Nat Prod 1999; 62:86-88.


Monday, 21 May 2012

An Antioxident Powerhouse


Tart cherries are packed with powerful antioxidants. In fact, they have among the highest levels of antioxidants of other super foods.2-5 Tart cherries ranked 14 in the top 50 foods for highest antioxidant content per serving size — surpassing well-known leaders such as red wine, prunes, dark chocolate and orange juice, according to one recent study.6












2-5  
2. Wu X, Beecher GR, Holden JM, Haytowitz DB, Gebhardt SE, Prior RL. Lipophilic and hydrophilic antioxidant capacities of common foods in the United States.
3. Kirakosyan A, Seymour EM, Llanes DEU, Kaufman PB, Bolling SF. Chemical profile and antioxidant capacities of tart cherry products.  
4. Seymour EM, Ou B. Phytochemical and diverse antioxidant profile of whole tart cherries J Agric Food Chem 2004;52:4026-4037.Food Chem 2009;115:20-25.(Prunus cerasus). FASEB J 2011;25:773.14.(Prunus cerasus). J Agric Food Chem 1999;47:840-844. 
5. Wang H, Nair MG, Strasburg GM, Booren AM, Gray JI. Antioxidant polyphenols from tart cherries.
6.  Halvorsen BL, Carlsen MH, Phillips KM, Bohn SK, Holte K, Jacobs DR, Blomhoff R. Content of redox-active compounds (i.e., antioxidants) in foods consumed in the United States. Am J Clin Nutr 2006;84:95-135.

Friday, 18 May 2012

How Tart Cherries Stack Up


Antioxidants were the number one most sought after ingredient in functional beverages in 2010 by over half of Americans.

Tart cherries have as much, if not more, antioxidants than many other fruits.

Friday, 11 May 2012

Red Recovery

 The Red Recovery

Increasingly, sports nutritionists are using tart cherries as part of a recovery program to support athletic performance and recovery. Here’s a sample “red recovery” routine designed to minimize inflammation, boost hydration and fuel the body.


Wednesday, 9 May 2012

The Nutrition of Tart Cherries

Cherry Nutrition Facts

Available dried, frozen or in juice and juice concentrates, cherries deliver a unique nutrient package.






Tuesday, 1 May 2012

Thanks to everyone who visited us at the Virgin London Marathon

More and more people have asked us about Cherry Juice and its virtues. We had 600 leaflets printed by Northumbria University Life Sciences. They went literally within the first few hours. So if anyone wants to check out the research you can find a link here. If it’s a bit too scientific visit www.choosecherries.co.uk for information on tart cherries.

The Choose Cherries stand was inundated with sampling requests during the 3 day event at London Excel as over 22,000 people sampled our tart cherry juice and wanted to know more about the benefits of tart cherries. We’ve obviously known about the benefits of this fruit for years but it’s good to know that the appetite for more information is increasing. Of course recent research helps the cause as it were.





Wednesday, 25 April 2012

Wow, what a fantastic response

What a fantastic response we have at the Excel Centre in London for the pre Virgin London Marathon Exhibition. During the four days over 22,000 samples of delicious tart cherry juice handed out to the general public and runners by our hand working stand staff.





Friday, 20 April 2012

Virgin London Marathon - Day 2!

Well it was a really eventful first day at the Virgin London Marathon exhibition with people from all over the world getting ready for Sunday’s race. Men and Women, Boys and girls, young and old, they were all represented and our stand at Choose Cherries was inundated with sampling requests as more people become aware of the benefits of drinking cherry juice and tart cherries in general. 

The race on Sunday is one of the world’s premier Marathon events and whilst international athletes will compete for the prestige of winning such a race, and the prizes on offer, many many more will smply be looking to prove a lot of personal points. Some are runninng in memory of a loved one, whilst others are using the race as a showcase for charity and are major fundraising opportunities.

Today - Friday - has been busier than yesterday and you can feel the buzz as the race looms ever closer!

Thursday, 19 April 2012

From Brighton to London

Last week the Brighton Marathon, this week the Virgin London Marathon

A great time was had by all at this years Brighton Marathon


Day 1 - Virgin London Marathon
This years Virgin London Marathon was opened by David Weir, the wimmer of the Virgin London Wheelchair Marathon 2012



The registration are is getting busy


Sampling cherry juice.


Wednesday, 18 April 2012

Virgin London Marathon - Come and visit us at Stand 520

Well today is the first day of the Virgin London Marathon exhibition at London ExCel –Docklands. The doors open at 11am and you can find us at Choose Cherries is on stand 520. WE CAN’T WAIT!




We are going to be sampling our cherry juice and making runners and sports fanatics aware of the great recovery qualities that cherries possess.


The organisers at Virgin reckon that today there will be around 15-20,000 visitors coming through the doors. So whether you are running in the race or not the exhibition is an opportunity that’s too good to miss for anyone interested in all things associated with running and fitness in general.


The 2012 Virgin London Marathon Exhibition will be the biggest ever as there has been an unprecedented demand from exhibitors to showcase their latest products and services. As well as all the major athletic brands there will be a multitude of other exhibitors and everything from everything from socks to global navigation devices to the latest niche products and nutrition-which is where we fit in. So come ad see the show and come and see us at the show. www.choosecherries.co.uk 

Tuesday, 17 April 2012

The Virgin London Marathon is almost here….

Wheelchair racing star David Weir and former boxer Michael Watson will open the Virgin London Marathon Expo at London Dockland’s Excel Exhibition Centre at 11am on Wednesday 18 April.
 
Held every year at Excel in London's Docklands throughout the registration process, the biggest and best venue in the country, the show attracts 70,000 visitors over its 4 open days. With 15000 visitors on the week days and 25000 on Saturday you may want to consider visiting in the week to avoid the rush on Saturday. Around 37,000 runners are expected to visit the Excel Exhibition Centre to register for the 2012 Virgin London Marathon before it closes at 5pm on Saturday.
 
Come and visit Choose Cherries us at the Virgin London Marathon Exhibition which is being held at the Excel Centre in London Docklands.

Public Opening Times

  • Wednesday 18 April 2012 11am until 8pm
  • Thursday 19 April 2012 10am until 8pm
  • Friday 20 April 2012 10am until 8pm
  • Saturday 21 April 2012   9am until 5pm

We look forward to seeing you there

Choose Cherries at the Brighton Marathon

Choose Cherries had a fantastic show at the Brighton Marathon Exhibition introducing Cherries to a whole new audience who simply weren’t aware of how good this fruit is for you in many ways.